• Views 72
  • Favorites
Photo by Roma Ryabchenko via Unsplash

Topics

Climate Change, Expository Writing

Grades

6th, 7th, 8th

Subjects

Science, Earth and Space Sciences, English Language Arts

Duration

120 minutes

Regional Focus

Global

Format

Google Docs, Google Slides

Share

This lesson plan is licensed under Creative Commons.

Creative Commons License

The Water Cycle and Climate Change (Water Cycle, Deforestation, and Climate Change #1)

Created By Teacher:
Last Updated:
Dec 8, 2022
0.0
|
|

In this lesson, students learn about the water cycle and how climate change impacts its patterns.

 

Step 1 - Inquire: Students contemplate their relationship with water and observe a demonstration to determine if shifting climates may affect the water cycle.

 

Step 2 - Investigate: Students explore an interactive diagram about the water cycle.

 

Step 3 - Inspire: Students watch a video and complete a series of questions in their student journals.

Positives

  • Students share diverse perspectives and ideas using the journal prompts which encourage action.

  • Students build on their unit journal with each additional lesson in the unit.

  • Students participate in multiple interactive and hands-on learning activities to engage in kinesthetic, auditory, and visual learning.

Additional Prerequisites

  • This is lesson 1 of 4 in our 6th-8th grade Water Cycle, Deforestation, and Climate Change unit.

  • Prior set-up is necessary for the Inquire section.

  • Materials required for the demonstration include the following:

    • 4 heat lamps (on a hot sunny day you can use the sun along with a way to amplify the sun's rays)

    • 3 bowls

    • 3 mugs or cups

    • plastic wrap

  • A recommended heat lamp can be purchased here.

  • Previous student knowledge of the water cycle and climate change will be beneficial in this unit. This interactive game can help students learn about the water cycle.

Differentiation

  • Students may use the Emotions Board for vocabulary support as they watch the video in the Inquire section.

  • The demonstration may be completed in lab groups with each group experimenting with a different system (control, drought, global warming).

  • Students may be placed in mixed-ability lab groups to aid in understanding.

  • Interactive diagrams can be differentiated based on ability.

  • Journal prompts can be used for whole group discussions.

This lesson introduces students to water cycle, water scarcity, and issues related to water conservation and climate change, including the global water crisis. Water scarcity and pollution are also discussed, and students are required to test hypotheses to determine if there is a relationship between climate change and the water cycle. All the data sources are properly cited, and this lesson has passed our science credibility process.

This resource addresses the listed standards. To fully meet standards, search for more related resources.

  • Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)
    • ESS2: Earth's Systems
      • MS-ESS2-4 Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth's systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.
  • Common Core English Language Arts Standards (CCSS.ELA)
    • Writing (K-12)
      • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
      • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
      • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
      • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
      • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
      • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
  • Teacher poses the following questions from the Teacher Slideshow and students participate in a class discussion:

    • What is a time in your life that you have had fun with water?

  • How do you use water in your everyday life?

  • Students watch a video from an Indigenous perspective on water.

    • Prior to the lessons teachers tape different emotions (empowered, scared, hopeful, thoughtful, sad, angry, surprised, etc.) around the room.

    • Students start with a paper and pencil. When they hear something that changes the way they feel, they move to the word in the room that best matches their emotion and write down a quick note about what was said that made them feel that way.

  • Students reflect on the following questions in a think-pair-share:

    • How did the video make you feel?

    • In what ways are the water cycle, climate change, and humans all interconnected?

  • Students create a hypothesis in response to the question: In what ways does climate change impact the water cycle? Students record their hypotheses in their digital or printable student journals.

  • Students participate in and observe a classroom demonstration that shows different climate situations and how this affects the water cycle.

  • Demonstration Setup Instructions:

    • Place a bowl under a heat source.

    • Using a pitcher filled with water, pour water into the bowl until it is about ¼ full.

    • Place a mug in the center of the bowl (making sure to keep it dry).

    • Cover the top of the bowl tightly with plastic wrap and use a rubber band to secure the plastic wrap into place (a small dip in the center of the plastic wrap will aid in showing students how the water cycle works).

    • Observe the water evaporate, condense at the cling wrap, and then “rain” into the plastic mug over time.

  • Demonstration Instructions: 

    • One water cycle demonstration shows a control system with a “normal” amount of water and sunlight (heat lamps are recommended but the sun may be used outside on a hot sunny day if desired).

    • One water cycle demonstration shows a system with much less water than “normal” (simulating a drought situation). This system should have equal heat and light source to the control system.

    • One water cycle demonstration shows a system with “normal” water but far above normal heat and light (simulating global warming). This can be shown by doubling the heat and light with an additional heat lamp or amplifying the sun's energy with something like a magnifying glass.

    • Students should view that a system with much less water does affect the water cycle as there is less water available to evaporate and condense in the system compared to the control, and that a system with much more heat will evaporate and condense more quickly, also affecting the processes of the water cycle compared to the control demonstration.

    • Allow for approximately 20 minutes (or more depending on results) to view the comparison between systems.

  • Students complete a lab write-up in their Student Journal to explain the findings of the classroom demonstration.

  • Students participate in a short think-pair-share followed by a whole group discussion to make sense of the demonstration.

  • Students investigate the water cycle using an interactive diagram to solidify their understanding of the water cycle.

  • Students reflect on their takeaways from the interactive diagram and ask any remaining questions they have about the water cycle.

  • Students think-pair-share using the question, “What role does gravity play in the water cycle?”

  • Students watch chapter two (1:12-2:33) of this video on climate change and the water cycle.

  • Students participate in an SEL-focused think-pair-share about the video.

  • Students determine if their hypothesis regarding the link between climate change and the water cycle is supported or not using clear reasons and relevant evidence.

  • Students address the following journal prompts in their Student Journal.

    • What is a body of water near you?

    • How is that body of water connected to the water cycle?

    • How is climate change impacting the body of water?

    • Can you think of any actions you or others can take to mitigate the problem?

Reviews

Login to leave a review