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Photo by Dave Hoefler via Unsplash

Topics

Climate Change, Expository Writing

Grades

6th, 7th, 8th

Subjects

Science, Earth and Space Sciences, English Language Arts

Duration

90 minutes

Regional Focus

Global

Format

Google Docs, Google Slides

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This lesson plan is licensed under Creative Commons.

Creative Commons License

Putting It All Together (Water Cycle, Deforestation, and Climate Change #4)

Created By Teacher:
Last Updated:
Dec 9, 2022
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In this lesson, students learn about extreme weather, create an infographic, and educate others on the knowledge gained from this unit.
 
Step 1 - Inquire: Students watch videos to understand why weather is becoming more extreme.
 
Step 2 - Investigate: Students create an infographic about extreme weather impacts in their area.
 
Step 3 - Inspire: Students educate others on the knowledge gained from this unit.

Positives

  • Students participate in multiple interactive and hands-on learning activities to engage in kinesthetic, auditory, and visual learning.

  • Students have an opportunity to share their growth and knowledge throughout the unit with other students and community members.

Additional Prerequisites

  • This is lesson 4 of 4 in our 6th-8th grade Water Cycle, Deforestation, and Climate Change unit.

  • Teachers need to determine how to choose the best course of action for sharing student learning. Options include the following:

    • Class vote

    • Teacher predetermines based on their best judgment

    • Student panel is created

    • Different groups choose different courses of action

Differentiation

  • Students may use the Emotions Board for vocabulary support as they watch the videos in the Inquire section

  • At the end of the unit, a classroom gallery walk is recommended.
  • Some ideas for extensions at the end of the unit include:

    • Inviting other classes in for a gallery walk

    • Hosting a community night where community members can be educated on what students have learned in the unit

    • Mailing student materials to different leaders in the community, particularly leaders that are in charge of the local water sources

This lesson allows students to understand the difference between weather and climate, the important variables that cause changes in weather, how weather and climate are predicted, the impact of weather extremes on the climate, and how human activities have accelerated wildfires, disrupted the water cycle, and caused other erratic weather disturbances in their communities. They would be able to explore which weather events are frequent and the overall combined impacts. All materials were rigorously reviewed, and this lesson has passed our science credibility process.

This resource addresses the listed standards. To fully meet standards, search for more related resources.

  • Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)
    • ESS2: Earth's Systems
      • MS-ESS2-4 Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth's systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.
  • Common Core English Language Arts Standards (CCSS.ELA)
    • Writing (K-12)
      • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
      • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
      • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
      • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
      • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
      • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
  • Students watch a video about the difference between weather and climate and reflect on what they learned.

  • Students get out a paper and pencil to prepare to take notes on their emotions from the upcoming video.

  • Students watch a video about extreme weather, take notes on their emotions, and reflect on why weather is becoming more extreme.

  • Teacher asks the questions:

    • How did learning that climate change is making weather extremes worse make you feel?

    • What type of extreme weather is most likely to affect your area?

    • How do you know?

  • Students determine which type of weather extremes are most likely to affect their area. It may be beneficial for teachers to discuss with students and confirm which weather extremes are most likely to affect their area.

  • Students research the projections:

    • Students can view flood and drought projections here or here.

    • Students can view fire trends here.

    • Students can view hurricane projections here.

    • All of the above may be researched here.

Students may also complete their own research on weather extremes in their area to assist them in the Investigate section of the lesson. This video can support with selecting credible sources.

  • Students create an infographic about extreme weather in their area, outlining the following questions:

    • Why are weather events becoming more extreme?

    • What extreme weather is most likely to impact their area?

    • Who is most likely to be impacted by extreme weather? Why?

    • How can your community mitigate or adapt to the impacts of extreme weather?

  • Students review the infographic steps:

    • Students review the information learned throughout the lesson.

    • Students determine why weather is becoming more extreme.

    • Students determine who is most likely to be impacted by extreme weather in their area and why.

    • Students determine how their community can mitigate or adapt to the impacts of extreme weather.

  • Students create their infographics. A sample infographic can be found here.
  • Students gather the materials from this unit and reflect on the impact of sharing the information collected in the following projects:

    • Water cycle and climate change prompts

    • Heat island mitigation proposal

    • Cause and effect diagram for deforestation, erosion, and climate change

    • Local extreme weather impact infographic

  • Students create a gallery walk of their materials. Students walk around and view each other's creations.

    • Students discuss how best to educate the public.

    • As a whole group, the class and teacher decide how best to share their information and create a plan to do so.

  • Students brainstorm ways to share their materials using guiding questions in the Teacher Slideshow.

  • Students share their learning in a way they feel is most impactful. Students are encouraged to come up with their own ideas and the following are suggestions to prompt brainstorming:

    • Invite other classes for a gallery walk.

    • Research a local official and email them. This sample email can be used for scaffolding support.

    • Organize a community night by inviting parents, community members, community leaders, and others to participate in a gallery walk of the students' materials. This sample flier can be used to help create an invitation. Students can stand next to their displays to explain their learning.
    • Take a group of students to present at a school board meeting, a town hall event, a county hall event, or another local meeting. This worksheet can support students to organize their thoughts and talking points in a C.E.R. model.

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